Republic of Georgia

Wikis > Republic of Georgia

 

Tbilisi_10A pretty picture of Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia, by “Matt Valentine”
http://www.mattvalentine.com/travel/

OVERALL ATMOSPHERE AND SECURITY

The Republic of Georgia is a safe country with little crime. The streets are safe and foreigners are welcome.

The real security problem is Russia to the north, and two (2) defacto independent regions inside the country that can be used by the Russians as a basis for further interference.

It would seem that there is little gun control in the Republic of Georgia, and that firearms are easy to obtain. The citizens of this country are not considered a threat to the government (or the government cannot do anything about it).

Although a relatively free country that respects individual liberty and rights, Georgians don’t seem to like homosexuals, and they have no tolerance for Muslims the practice of which is banned in most places

COUNTRY STATISTICS

IMMIGRATION POLICY

BUSINESS CLIMATE

Some info about the Republic of Georgia:
Georgia has a very easy and friendly tax system:
VAT: 18%
PERSONAL INCOME TAX: 18% (TO BE REDUCED TO 15% NEXT YEAR)
CORPORATE PROFIT TAX: 15%
DIVIDENDS & INTEREST: 3% (TO BE ELIMINATED IN 2014)
* No payroll tax or social insurance tax
* Capital expenditure can be depreciated fully in the year it has been incurred of the operation, and 10-year loss carry forward is available
* No capital gains tax
* No wealth tax, inheritance tax or stamp duty
* Foreign-source income of individuals fully exempted
and this is all everyday rules, and does not include Free Trade Zones, and other development incentive programs.

GOVERNMENT RESPECT FOR PERSONAL LIBERTY AND GOVERNMENT INTERFERENCE IN GENERAL

Georgia is not paradise. It has come a long way from the debilitating civil wars of the 1990s, and the rank corruption that followed. But it has a long way to go. The reforms that have been put in place seem to be working, but the underlying nature of life in Georgia is going to take longer to sort out. For a candid analysis see: http://ifair.wordpress.com/2012/06/20/the-political-economy-of-georgias-transformation-before-and-after-the-rose-revolution/

Taking into account the overall development of the political economy of Georgia since 2003, it can be concluded that the ‘success story’ of the country’s transformation is not as shiny as framed by many. While the Rose Revolution has without doubt led to numerous remarkable changes of the economic and political institutions, many of the previously existing problems have prevailed below the surface of Georgia’s transformation. Although more effective economic policies were introduced in several areas, this often happened at the cost of democratic governance mechanisms. Institutional economists have outlined that “in order to reach a considerable level of human development and to make development less uneven, three conditions are fundamental, together with GDP growth. They are 1) management of social conflicts, 2) reducing inequality, 3) giving economic opportunities and to exploit those opportunities” (Tridico 2006: 37). In Georgia, the third condition has partly been met after Saakashvili took office, however, conditions 1 and 2 need to be further tackled. In the coming months and years, it remains to be seen if the Georgian transformation may go beyond formal reforms and can further influence also problematic informal institutional structures such as ongoing high-level corruption. The upcoming parliamentary and presidential elections and Saakashvili’s related actions (Civil Georgia 2011) will be a litmus test in this regard.

 

About fafc

The goal of the “Find a Free Country Project” is to research, explore and find a safe and secure free country outside the USA, that is not too large, has a relatively open immigration policy, has a friendly business climate, has a non-intrusive government committed to freedom, and then move to it.
Bookmark the permalink.